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martes 26 septiembre 2017



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Trincadura


The decline in military shipbuilding from the nineteenth century encouraged the use of smaller ships. Gunboats (lanchas cañoneras) played a very active part in the First Carlist War. The clinker design of these military launches is widely known on Spain’s Atlantic coast as “trincadura”, and in the Basque Country the term was adopted to refer to the vessels themselves. With the introduction of traditional fishing launches into the battle, (which proved superior to the military boats), a new flush-laid “trincadura” soon developed (despite the apparent contradiction in terms). For several decades, this vessel was used for coastal surveillance and marine rescue. The trincadura, designed for speed and freed of the restrictions imposed by fishing and cargo transport, was probably the maximum expression of maritime technology among smaller vessels in the Basque Country.

“Strong, well-built but quite finely-shaped ships which perform
very well at sea". (Dictionnaire de la Marine à Voile, 1856).
“Strong, well-built but quite finely-shaped ships which perform very well at sea". (Dictionnaire de la Marine à Voile, 1856). © José Lopez
The military launches were the only clinker-built ones on this
coast in the nineteenth century. This distinguishing feature became
a sign of identity, and the Basque seafaring community referred to
them as trincaduras. Local smooth-hulled boats on military
functions subsequently adopted the same name, despite the contradiction
The military launches were the only clinker-built ones on this coast in the nineteenth century. This distinguishing feature became a sign of identity, and the Basque seafaring community referred to them as trincaduras. Local smooth-hulled boats on military functions subsequently adopted the same name, despite the contradiction. © José Lopez

Bayonne trincadura in Pasaia, supporting the liberal forces in
the First Carlist War. It is fitted with a number of guns, in this case
a stone-throwing mortar secured on the gunwale.
Bayonne trincadura in Pasaia, supporting the liberal forces in the First Carlist War. It is fitted with a number of guns, in this case a stone-throwing mortar secured on the gunwale. © José Lopez

This view gives details of the sails used on this large trincadura.
A topsail can be seen, over the mainsail and the rigging is well
detailed with halyards, topping lifts and preventer shrouds.
This view gives details of the sails used on this large trincadura. A topsail can be seen, over the mainsail and the rigging is well detailed with halyards, topping lifts and preventer shrouds. © José Lopez

Sail plan of a trincadura from the nineteenth century, given by
the Marquis of Folin to the Vice-Admiral Paris to be published in
“Souvenirs de Marine”.
Sail plan of a trincadura from the nineteenth century, given by the Marquis of Folin to the Vice-Admiral Paris to be published in “Souvenirs de Marine”. © José Lopez
Similar in character to the cargo and fishing launches, the
trincaduras had more refined proportions, giving the extra speed
needed to intercept the enemy.
Similar in character to the cargo and fishing launches, the trincaduras had more refined proportions, giving the extra speed needed to intercept the enemy. © José Lopez

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