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miércoles 22 noviembre 2017



Bertan > Our boats > Modern tuna boat
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Modern tuna boat


One of the peculiarities of the modern fishing industry in the Basque Country is the extent to which craft fishing techniques have survived, backed by modern technology. Despite motorisation they continue to use the technique of trolling, which with the adoption of cold stores has allowed fishing voyages to be extended. From the middle of the twentieth century, trolling had to compete with live–bait fishing. This new technique was imported a few years before from California and managed to take a foothold amongst the larger tuna boats, with trolling restricted to smaller tuna boats and sports vessels. It is worth noting that the two systems used still at this time by Basque fishermen are both highly selective and offer consumers the best quality fish.

Multi-purpose diesel-powered tuna boat. 1940. The replacement
of steam by diesel, completed by the 1940s, freed up more
space on board. The coal store, boiler and fresh water tank for the
steam were replaced by refrigerators for storing the fish. This
increased the number of fishing days and enhanced productivity.
Multi-purpose diesel-powered tuna boat. 1940. The replacement of steam by diesel, completed by the 1940s, freed up more space on board. The coal store, boiler and fresh water tank for the steam were replaced by refrigerators for storing the fish. This increased the number of fishing days and enhanced productivity. © José Lopez
Development of the bow and stern of the fishing vessels. The
change in the boat’s profile is associated with an increase in engine
power, as vessels were adapted to local sea conditions.
Development of the bow and stern of the fishing vessels. The change in the boat’s profile is associated with an increase in engine power, as vessels were adapted to local sea conditions. © José Lopez

Tuna boat from the 1970s. During this period, fishing boats
already carried electronic navigation and fishing equipment. They
incorporated a motorised net-lifter, meaning that it was no longer
necessary to pull in the nets by hand, significantly improving working
conditions on board.
Tuna boat from the 1970s. During this period, fishing boats already carried electronic navigation and fishing equipment. They incorporated a motorised net-lifter, meaning that it was no longer necessary to pull in the nets by hand, significantly improving working conditions on board. © José Lopez

Albacore, (Thunnus alalunga. Bonn).
Albacore, (Thunnus alalunga. Bonn). © José Lopez

Modern tuna boat from the 1990s. Today's large deep-sea
tuna boats incorporate the most advanced tuna-catching technology.
They cast an enormous encircling net, which is spread out with
the help of powerful launches. The boats are guided by helicopters
carried on board. Among other areas, they now fish in the great
fishing grounds of the Indian Ocean
Modern tuna boat from the 1990s. Today's large deep-sea tuna boats incorporate the most advanced tuna-catching technology. They cast an enormous encircling net, which is spread out with the help of powerful launches. The boats are guided by helicopters carried on board. Among other areas, they now fish in the great fishing grounds of the Indian Ocean. © José Lopez
Steam ship from 1910. This is the ship that was to oust the
traditional sail-powered fishing boats. Their principal success lay in
the fact that they could still operate in the calm periods common
to the summer months when the tuna visit these coasts.
Steam ship from 1910. This is the ship that was to oust the traditional sail-powered fishing boats. Their principal success lay in the fact that they could still operate in the calm periods common to the summer months when the tuna visit these coasts. © José Lopez

17-metre tuna boat built in 1952, showing fish tanks and rods.
The larger boats soon opted for the technique of live bait, relegating
the trolling system to the smaller boats. This technique requires
having fish tanks on deck in which to keep the beita (from the
English “bait”), usually consisting of species such as sardine and
horse mackerel.
17-metre tuna boat built in 1952, showing fish tanks and rods. The larger boats soon opted for the technique of live bait, relegating the trolling system to the smaller boats. This technique requires having fish tanks on deck in which to keep the beita (from the English “bait”), usually consisting of species such as sardine and horse mackerel. © José Lopez
Atuna.
Tuna. © José Lopez

Tuna boat from the 1970s. Orio. This was the last period in
which traditional wooden tuna boats were used; some were built
in steel to the same measurements and proportions and vessels of
up to 35 metres in length were built. This period marked the decline
of timber shipbuilding in the Basque Country.
Tuna boat from the 1970s. Orio. This was the last period in which traditional wooden tuna boats were used; some were built in steel to the same measurements and proportions and vessels of up to 35 metres in length were built. This period marked the decline of timber shipbuilding in the Basque Country. © José Lopez
Tuna boat in polyester. At the beginning of the twenty-first
century, tuna boats began to be built in polyester, like this one
made in the Olaziregi shipyards in Hondarribia. These new units
have a transom stern, leaving plenty of room to work on deck. The
change in the outline of the vessels has been linked to an increase
in the power of the engines. Similar boats have also been built,
al-though of greater size -with a steel hull- in the Luzuriaga shipyards
in Pasaia. They are fitted out with the most advanced technology.
Tuna boat in polyester. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, tuna boats began to be built in polyester, like this one made in the Olaziregi shipyards in Hondarribia. These new units have a transom stern, leaving plenty of room to work on deck. The change in the outline of the vessels has been linked to an increase in the power of the engines. Similar boats have also been built, al-though of greater size -with a steel hull- in the Luzuriaga shipyards in Pasaia. They are fitted out with the most advanced technology. © José Lopez

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